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What Do You Know About Adderall

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are central nervous system stimulants that affect chemicals in the brain and nerves that contribute to hyperactivity and impulse control.

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine is a combination medicine used to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

USES

What is Adderall used for?

WARNINGS

What is the most important information I should know about Adderall?

Do not use this medicine if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

You may not be able to use amphetamine and dextroamphetamine if you have:

  • an allergy to any stimulant medicine;
  • high blood pressure, heart disease, coronary artery disease (hardened arteries);
  • overactive thyroid;
  • glaucoma;
  • severe anxiety, tension, or agitation (stimulant medicine can make these symptoms worse); or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, or medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. These medicines may interact with amphetamine and dextroamphetamine and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome.

Stimulants have caused stroke, heart attack, and sudden death in certain people. Tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart problems or a congenital heart defect;
  • high blood pressure; or
  • a family history of heart disease or sudden death.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has ever had:

  • depression, mental illness, bipolar disorder, psychosis, or suicidal thoughts or actions;
  • motor tics (muscle twitches) or Tourette’s syndrome;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • an abnormal brain wave test (EEG);
  • kidney disease; or
  • blood circulation problems in the hands or feet.

Taking this medicine during pregnancy can cause premature birth, low birth weight, or withdrawal symptoms in the newborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

You should not breast-feed while you are using this medicine.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice. Not every brand of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine is for use in the same age group of children

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Taking MAO inhibitors with this medication may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Avoid taking MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazidlinezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzineprocarbazinerasagiline, safinamide, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with this medication. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before treatment with this medication. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking this medication.

Some products have ingredients that could raise your heart rate or blood pressure. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially cough-and-cold products or diet aids).

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Addiction to Adderall

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Adderall is an addictive prescription stimulant with effects similar to meth.

Although not everyone who uses Adderall will develop an addiction, people regularly taking Adderall at unprescribed doses are at a high risk of becoming addicted.

Over time, those habitually using Adderall develop a tolerance to the drug and are unable to function normally without it.

 

Adderall works by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the central nervous system. Norepinephrine affects how the brain responds to events, particularly how it pays attention and the speed at which it reacts to outside stimuli. Dopamine, the body’s “feel good” chemical, creates a rewarding effect. Although dopamine occurs naturally, drugs like Adderall produce unnaturally high levels of it. This can cause users to come back for more.

The brain of an addicted person is dependent on Adderall to stimulate alertness and productivity. Without Adderall, addicted people often feel tired and mentally foggy. These are symptoms of Adderall withdrawal, a strong sign of an addiction.

Common signs of an Adderall addiction include:

  • Needing larger doses to feel the drug’s effects
  • Wanting to cut down on use but not having the ability to do so
  • Taking the drug despite knowledge of the harm it’s causing
  • Not being able to finish work without Adderall
  • Spending a lot of time and money getting, using, and recovering from the drug
  • Being unable to feel alert without the drug
  • Neglecting other normal or important activities in favor of using Adderall
  • Suffering withdrawal symptoms when not using Adderall
 

No one intends on becoming addicted to Adderall. Usually, the problem starts as a way of increasing productivity on a stressful day at work or to study for an important test. Some people even fake the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to get their own prescription for the drug.

This is how many people eventually become addicted to Adderall and soon prioritize the drug over everything else.

Uninsured, I chose to pay hundreds for a refill instead of buying groceries. I’d consume far more than my allocated dose, then spend sleepless nights tossing and turning, my mind racing and heart pounding, only to wake up and take another pill with a coffee to compensate.

– Writer and former Adderall addict Kate Miller, New York Times, 2013

The withdrawal symptoms caused by Adderall addiction makes it hard for users to quit on their own. These withdrawal symptoms can seem unbearable for some. Getting the help of a therapist or treatment center increases the chances of successfully quitting.

Adderall Dependence Vs. Adderall Addiction

An Adderall dependence is a natural, expected physiological response to the drug. The individual has a physical dependence due to the interaction of the chemicals in the body (even if taken as prescribed) but not a psychological dependence where they are abusing the medication to reach a “high.” They may require assistance from their doctor to get off the medication due to the way the chemicals affect the brain; however they are not mentally obsessing or craving Adderall.

An Adderall addiction refers to a person’s physical and/or psychological reliance on Adderall along with a specific set of behaviors. These individuals are usually unable to cope when they stop taking Adderall and will go to any length to obtain more of the medication. Use of the drug becomes the main priority of the individual. They often run out of their prescription early due to taking more than prescribed, leaving them in withdrawal from the substance, which results in going to any length to obtain more of the substance. Obsessive thoughts about Adderall and cravings are also an indicator of addictive behavior.

Understanding Adderall (Prescription Amphetamines)

Adderall, a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant, is the most commonly prescribed amphetamine. It is a schedule II controlled substance because of its strong addictive potential.

Doctors prescribe Adderall to treat narcolepsy and ADHD. While it decreases fatigue in narcoleptic patients, it has the opposite effect in those with ADHD.

Adderall comes as a tablet to be ingested orally with doses ranging from 5 to 30 milligrams. Some people looking for immediate effects may crush up their tablets and snort Adderall. Street names for Adderall include speed, uppers, black beauties, Addys and pep pills.

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What are Adderall’s side effects?

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Common side effects of Adderall can include:

  • weight loss
  • stomach pain
  • headaches
  • dry mouth
  • sleep problems.

Children who take Adderall may experience a temporary slowing in their rate of growth. If you experience major side effects, report them to your doctor immediately and stop using the medication. Major side effects can include trouble breathing, chest pains, seizures, hallucinations, changes in
vision, unexplained muscle pain, dark colored urine, or changes in skin color. You can also report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online.

Are there any psychiatric side effects associated with taking Adderall?

People who take Adderall may experience nervousness and mood swings.

How do you know if Adderall therapy is right for you?

Talk to your doctor about whether you are a good fit for the medication. Also, always take medication in the exact amount prescribed by your doctor. There
are many different dosage strengths, depending on whether you are taking Adderall IR (immediate release) or Adderall XR (extended release). Your doctor
should work with you to make sure the medication is working and adjust dosing and formulas as needed.

Are there potential interaction issues for people taking Adderall?

Do not take Adderall if you have taken an MAO inhibitor in the past two weeks, as a dangerous interaction effect could occur. There are also hundreds of
drugs that are known to interact with Adderall in major, moderate, or mild ways. So let your doctor know what other medications you are taking before you
begin Adderall therapy. Some of these include antacids, antidepressants, blood pressure medication, blood thinners, allergy medications, pain medicine, and
seizure medicine.

Are there any major differences between Adderall and Ritalin?

There are a lot of similarities between the two medications. Both drugs are stimulants used to treat ADHD, and both are habit-forming and classified as
Schedule II controlled substances. Therefore, if you have a history of substance use problems, you should talk to your doctor about this before taking
either medication. As far as differences, some studies suggest that Adderall may be more effective, but may have a higher abuse potential. Adderall comes
in two formats: instant release (lasting 4-6 hours) and extended release (lasting 12 hours). Ritalin, meanwhile, comes in three formats: instant release
(lasting 3-4 hours), sustained release (lasting 6-8 hours), and long-acting (lasting 8 hours).

Are there any other medical conditions that would make someone ineligible for Adderall therapy?

You should not take Adderall if you are allergic to the medication. Also, if you have high blood pressure, heart disease, an overactive thyroid, or glaucoma, you should not take Adderall. The drug can also make symptoms of severe anxiety even worse. Also talk to your doctor if you have Tourette’s syndrome, seizures or epilepsy, circulation problems, a history of mental illness, such as depression or bipolar disorder, or a history of substance use problems.

What is the typical dose prescribed to someone taking Adderall?

Children 6 and over taking Adderall usually start at a dosage of 5 mg and may gradually increase dosage up to 30mg. Adults taking Adderall may start with 5
mg and work their way up to a 60 mg dose. However, it’s important to talk to your doctor and not adjust dosage without their recommendation.

How long does it usually take for Adderall to work?

Adderall immediate release (IR) starts working roughly 20 to 30 minutes after being ingested, and it reaches its peak effectiveness approximately 1 to 2
hours after taking it. Adderall extended release (XR) begins working after 30 minutes and has a longer-lasting effect.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

You should never take extra doses of the medication to make up for missed doses. Your doctor may recommend taking the dose of Adderall when you remember, but skipping the missed dose if it already or almost evening.

Can symptoms occur if Adderall is discontinued?

Because Adderall is a stimulant, people can feel sluggish as the drug begins to wear off. Withdrawal symptoms can also include hunger, sleep problems, panic attacks, craving the drug, fatigue irritability, low mood, and suicidal thoughts. Symptoms can last for a few days or up to a few weeks. It’s important to eat healthy, exercise, and have a consistent sleep routine to help alleviate withdrawal symptoms.

What should I do if I overdose on Adderall?

An overdose of Adderall could be fatal, so seek immediately help or call the Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222 if you overdose. Overdose symptoms can
include muscle twitches or pain, rapid breathing, panic, restlessness, aggressiveness, tiredness, vomiting, nausea, dark colored urine, diarrhea, irregular
heartbeat, seizures, and coma.

Is it safe for a woman who is pregnant, trying to become pregnant or nursing to take Adderall?

Taking Adderall while pregnant can cause withdrawal symptoms in a newborn as well as premature birth or low birth weight. The drug can also be transferred via breastmilk in small amounts and may harm a baby. Therefore, talk to your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are nursing before you take Adderall.

Is Adderall habit-forming?

Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance and can be habit-forming as users may develop a tolerance to the drug over time. Sometimes Adderall is abused and used for student performance. It is also sometimes used as a party drug because it creates a surge of energy and euphoria. Make sure that you keep track of the medication and never take more than prescribed. It is illegal to give or sell the medication to others. Talk to your doctor if you have a past history of substance dependence before you begin Adderall Therapy.

How much does Adderall cost?

Sixty 20mg amphetamine salt tablets range in cost from $40-60. Buying brand name Adderall is more expensive.

Are there any disadvantages to Adderall?

The biggest disadvantage of Adderall is that it is highly habit-forming. If you have a history of abusing substances or have a history of substance use in your family, then the drug may not be right for you. Also, common side effects such as decreased appetite, drowsiness, nervousness, and headaches may outweigh the benefits.

 

 

 

Sources:

1. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM467750.pdf

2. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085819.pdf

DISCLAIMER: The information contained herein should NOT be used as a substitute for the advice of an appropriately qualified and licensed physician or other health care provider. This article mentions drugs that were FDA-approved and available at the time of publication and may not include all possible drug interactions or all FDA warnings or alerts. The author of this page explicitly does not endorse this drug or any specific treatment method. If you have health questions or concerns about interactions, please check with your physician or go to the FDA site for a comprehensive list of warnings.

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Addiction to Adderall

adderall addiction pill

Adderall is an addictive prescription stimulant with effects similar to meth.

Although not everyone who uses Adderall will develop an addiction, people regularly taking Adderall at unprescribed doses are at a high risk of becoming addicted.

Over time, those habitually using Adderall develop a tolerance to the drug and are unable to function normally without it.

 

Adderall works by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the central nervous system. Norepinephrine affects how the brain responds to events, particularly how it pays attention and the speed at which it reacts to outside stimuli. Dopamine, the body’s “feel good” chemical, creates a rewarding effect. Although dopamine occurs naturally, drugs like Adderall produce unnaturally high levels of it. This can cause users to come back for more.

The brain of an addicted person is dependent on Adderall to stimulate alertness and productivity. Without Adderall, addicted people often feel tired and mentally foggy. These are symptoms of Adderall withdrawal, a strong sign of an addiction.

Common signs of an Adderall addiction include:

  • Needing larger doses to feel the drug’s effects
  • Wanting to cut down on use but not having the ability to do so
  • Taking the drug despite knowledge of the harm it’s causing
  • Not being able to finish work without Adderall
  • Spending a lot of time and money getting, using, and recovering from the drug
  • Being unable to feel alert without the drug
  • Neglecting other normal or important activities in favor of using Adderall
  • Suffering withdrawal symptoms when not using Adderall
 

No one intends on becoming addicted to Adderall. Usually, the problem starts as a way of increasing productivity on a stressful day at work or to study for an important test. Some people even fake the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to get their own prescription for the drug.

This is how many people eventually become addicted to Adderall and soon prioritize the drug over everything else.

Uninsured, I chose to pay hundreds for a refill instead of buying groceries. I’d consume far more than my allocated dose, then spend sleepless nights tossing and turning, my mind racing and heart pounding, only to wake up and take another pill with a coffee to compensate.

– Writer and former Adderall addict Kate Miller, New York Times, 2013

The withdrawal symptoms caused by Adderall addiction makes it hard for users to quit on their own. These withdrawal symptoms can seem unbearable for some. Getting the help of a therapist or treatment center increases the chances of successfully quitting.

Adderall Dependence Vs. Adderall Addiction

An Adderall dependence is a natural, expected physiological response to the drug. The individual has a physical dependence due to the interaction of the chemicals in the body (even if taken as prescribed) but not a psychological dependence where they are abusing the medication to reach a “high.” They may require assistance from their doctor to get off the medication due to the way the chemicals affect the brain; however they are not mentally obsessing or craving Adderall.

An Adderall addiction refers to a person’s physical and/or psychological reliance on Adderall along with a specific set of behaviors. These individuals are usually unable to cope when they stop taking Adderall and will go to any length to obtain more of the medication. Use of the drug becomes the main priority of the individual. They often run out of their prescription early due to taking more than prescribed, leaving them in withdrawal from the substance, which results in going to any length to obtain more of the substance. Obsessive thoughts about Adderall and cravings are also an indicator of addictive behavior.

Understanding Adderall (Prescription Amphetamines)

Adderall, a potent central nervous system (CNS) stimulant, is the most commonly prescribed amphetamine. It is a schedule II controlled substance because of its strong addictive potential.

Doctors prescribe Adderall to treat narcolepsy and ADHD. While it decreases fatigue in narcoleptic patients, it has the opposite effect in those with ADHD.

Adderall comes as a tablet to be ingested orally with doses ranging from 5 to 30 milligrams. Some people looking for immediate effects may crush up their tablets and snort Adderall. Street names for Adderall include speed, uppers, black beauties, Addys and pep pills.

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Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

After an oral dose of Adderall, peak plasma concentrations occur in about three hours. For Adderall XR, the peak concentration occurs in about seven hours.

Amphetamines are excreted in the urine. Typically, 30 percent to 40 percent of the administered dose is recovered in the urine as amphetamine, and 50 percent is recovered as the inactive metabolite alpha-hydroxy-amphetamine.

The half-life of Adderall and Adderall XR varies by age:

  • Children 6–11 years: 9 to 11 hours
  • Children 12–18 years: 11 to 14 hours
  • Adults: 10 to 13 hours

Contraindications

Adderall is contraindicated in the following conditions:

  • advanced arteriosclerosis
  • symptomatic cardiovascular disease
  • moderate-to-severe hypertension
  • hyperthyroidism
  • hypersensitivity or idiosyncrasy to the sympathomimetic amines
  • glaucoma
  • agitated states
  • history of drug abuse
  • during or within 14 days following the administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitors due to risk of hypertensive crisis

Abuse and dependence

Amphetamines contained in Adderall are extensively abused. People taking amphetamines can develop extreme psychological dependence and tolerance. In some cases of amphetamine misuse, people have used doses several times higher than what is recommended.

In those dependent on amphetamines, severe withdrawal can occur when the medication is abruptly stopped. Withdrawal symptoms can include extreme fatigue, depression, and sleep disruption.

Symptoms of chronic abuse or intoxication with amphetamines can include:

  • dermatoses
  • hyperactivity
  • insomnia
  • moodiness or irritability
  • psychosis in severe cases

Storage

Adderall should be stored in a tightly closed, light-resistant container. Storage temperature should be 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).

Disclaimer: MedicalNewsToday has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.